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Travis Scott’s signature Jordan sneaker line is finally about to hit the streets, and after a small shock drop went down a few months ago, the hype for the sneakers have only grown with every passing week.

 

According to Highsnobiety, the Jordan Brand “Jumpman Jack” is set to release April 30. Needless to say, these will be an instant sellout as the mocha colorway coupled with the reverse swoosh is basically a bank shot when it comes to sneakerheads these days. While there are a few colorways that are supposed to release in the near future, the white and mocha brown color blocking is up to bat first, and with pairs from the shock drop reselling for more than $700, you can expect these to be a hard cop.

Per Highsnobiety:

There’s also plenty of Scott insignia throughout the sneaker, such as his Cactus Jack motifs embroidered on the heels to the scribbled “Jack” on the translucent outsole, ready to wear away with time (or maybe even a single trip to the mosh pit).

The Jumpman Jack sneaker’s second biggest feature is the large strap over the forefoot, topped with raised co-branding and locking fans in for a raging ride.

Underneath these Scott-approved touches, the Jordan Jumpman Jack sneakers offer up a bit of nostalgia. The shoe’s overall shape evokes the feels of Nike’s old-school athletic shoes like the Mac Attack (Scott knows a thing about the model).

No word on how many pairs will be available come release day but given Jordan Brand’s history of only producing between 100,000 – 250,000 of their Travis Scott collaborations (millions of sneakerheads want these), we don’t have much hope that there will be enough pairs to go around come April 30.

Check out pics of the “Jumpman Jack” sneakers, and let us know if you’ll be trying to get a pair come the end of the month in the comments section below.

Travis Scott’s Jordan “Jumpman Jack” To Drop At The End Of The Month  was originally published on hiphopwired.com