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Snoop Dogg And Wiz Khalifa Perform At Rogers Arena

Source: Andrew Chin / Getty

Snoop Dogg — Doggystyle (30th Anniversary Edition)

Snoop Dogg released his debut album, the beloved Doggystyle, 30 years ago. So today, in order to celebrate three decades of a classic, impactful offering, Tha Doggfather unveils its 30th anniversary edition.

This new version comes with every song from the original version, including hits like “Gin and Juice,” “Murder Was The Case,” “Who Am I (What’s My Name)?” and “Ain’t No Fun (If The Homies Can’t Have None).” But, one song has collectors and fans celebrating its inclusion perhaps more than others.

That’s because “Gz Up, H-es Down” also appears here. It was originally included but later removed due to a sample of Isaac Hayes’ “The Look of Love.” Isaac Hayes III recently took to. social media to discuss the issue.

“It’s always been missing this one song from the original pressing,” he said in a video. “That song contained a sample [of] my father, Isaac Hayes, that was not allowed to be used on the album, not because of him, but the powers that be at the time. But, as you can see, it’ll be back for the 30th edition.”

Snoop also celebrated this on social media. “You may want to get your hands on this, especially if you’re a DJ and if you’re a real collector,” he said. “You know what’s up.”

Tha Doggfather spoke on the album’s inspiration back when it was first released. “It is about what I grew up with, what I been through, what goes on today,” he told The Guardian at the time. “It’s just everyday life, if it didn’t happen, I couldn’t make money off it. If this sh-t didn’t occur, there wouldn’t be no people buyin’ it…I’m just speakin’ real.”

Busta Rhymes — Blockbusta

Stars come to mind when one thinks of a true blockbuster. That’s precisely what Busta Rhymes delivers with his newest album, Blockbusta, as the iconic rapper teams up with legendary producers Pharrell Williams, Timbaland, and Swizz Beatz as the project’s executive producers.

Beyond these celebrated names, Busta also taps some other big name features. Quavo, Young Thug, BIA, Coi Leray, T-Pain, and Burna Boy all make appearances here. Plus, DaBaby, Chris Brown, Kodak Black, and more join the 19-song effort as well.

Busta Rhymes spoke about the executive producers of the album during an Apple Music interview. “They helped fix Bus Rhymes,” he said. “My brothers are executive producing my new album. So I gotta talk to them. I gotta send them the music even when there’s other producers contributing to the project because they’re overseeing the whole [thing], every step of the way. They are micromanaging this whole moment for me.”

Lupe Fiasco — “3,048”

When André 3000 released his newest album, New Blue Sun, some fans complained about a lack of bars. After all, the OutKast MC unveiled an instrumental LP. But Lupe Fiasco didn’t complain about it. Instead, he decided to drop his own rhymes.

“Gonna rap all over that 3stacks album and put it in the time capsule for future generations,” he promised on social media. Soon after that, he delivered “3,048,” his own rendition of André’s “I swear, I Really Wanted To Make A ‘Rap’ Album But This Is Literally The Way The Wind Blew Me This Time.”

He rhymes over the ethereal soundscape and has a message for listeners. “I’m starting to take offense,” he raps. “Y’all better put some respect / on them platforms that y’all speak at / on this thing that we rap.”

Lu released the new song along with a photo. “That’s me an Virgil at LV,” he explained in the caption. “He showing me the custom case he made for 3 Stacks flute.” Now, the song brings that moment full circle.

J. Stone f. Nipsey Hussle, B.H. — “Foundation”

J. Stone, an integral member of Nipsey Hussle All Money In team, made a name for himself with projects like The Definition of Pain and The Definition of Sacrifice. Nip appeared on both of those projects and now, he shows up once more on “Foundation” from Stone’s newest album, The Definition of Success.

Over Hit-Boy’s production, Hussle delivers a guide to success in rhyme form. “First you gotta pay dues/ Then you gotta make moves,” he explains on the song. “And you know the game tests you; you just gotta stay true / First they’re prolly like, ‘Cool’ / Then you finally break through / But you ain’t gotta play cool, they just gotta make room.”

Stone follows this up with a response. “I’ma bet on myself,” he commits. “I ain’t ever had to sit on a shelf / I’m creating generational wealth / Took a loss but got wins on the belt / We was hungry, they don’t know how it felt.”

Stone recently spoke about the creation and evolution of the song during an interview with Bootleg Kev. “This is something that we worked on in 2018,” he said. “[But] we spiced up the beat just a little bit because it’s 2023 now.”

STREAMED: Snoop Dogg Celebrates 30th Anniversary Of “Doggystyle” With Special Edition Release, Busta Rhymes Drops “Blockbusta,” & More  was originally published on cassiuslife.com